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Home  >  Livestock & Pasture  >   Integrated Parasite Management for Livestock (Summary)

Integrated Parasite Management for Livestock



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Digital Price:

 Free

Print Price:

 Unavailable

By Ann Wells

Published: 1999

Updated: 1999

© NCAT

IP150

9 pages


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Please note: This ATTRA publication has been archived or discontinued.
Therefore, the information contained in it may not be up to date.


Introduction

Internal parasites can be a major problem for producers. With parasites developing resistance to all dewormers and more farmers producing livestock by 'natural' methods, there is interest in looking for alternative ways to managing parasite problems. Management is the most important thing to consider. The whole system affects internal parasites. Nutrition and pasture management can help prevent problems by improving the health of the animals. There are soil organisms that kill or prevent the development of internal parasites. Strategic deworming means planning the timing when deworming is done. This can also be an important part of any management scheme. Little is known about the effectiveness of any alternative dewormer. Changes will have to be done slowly while observing their outcome.

Table of Contents

Introduction
Nutrition
Pasture Management
Immunity
Soil Organisms
Effect of Ivermectin on Dung Beetles
Strategic Deworming
Alternative Dewormers
Conditions with Signs Similar to Parasitism
Conclusion
References
Suggested Reading

Note: Digital downloads are in full color. Printed, mailed copies are only available in black & white.

 

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This page was last updated on: December 12, 2016