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Home  > Question of the Week

Question of the Week



Permalink How is low-spray defined?

Answer: The term low-spray has no precise definition. It simply refers to a reduced-synthetic-pesticide spray program relative to a region’s prevailing conventional practices. For example, instead of eight to 12 spray applications during a growing season, a low-spray program using sophisticated monitoring and other integrated pest management (IPM) techniques may consist of only two to four.

The terms organic and organically grown have precise legal definitions. Organic production and marketing of food crops is regulated at the Federal level. Before land can be certified organic, it must be free of synthetic pesticides and commercial fertilizers for three years, and only pest-control and fertilizer inputs approved for organic production may be used thereafter.

Producers who want to label or market their produce as organic must be certified by an agent accredited by USDA’s National Organic Program. For more information, see the ATTRA publication Organic Certification. If your operation is certified organic or if you are seeking certification, check with your certifier before using any pest-control material to confirm its acceptability for organic production.

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