carbon sequestration Tag

Related ATTRA publication: Agriculture, Climate Disruption, and Carbon Sequestration Research results published by Michigan State University say that an integrated approach to land management practices in the U.S. can reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere far more than earlier estimates based on separate approaches. A multi-institute team explored how combining bioenergy with land-management practices known to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions for cropland, grazing land, and forests would affect atmospheric carbon dioxide. "We're excited to explore this approach further and fine tune our understanding," study author Phil Robertson said. "But for now, we're confident that an integrated approach that combines bioenergy and advanced management...

Scientists at the University of Sheffield have published a study that says adding rock dust to UK agricultural soils could absorb up to 45% of the atmospheric carbon dioxide needed to reach net zero. The study found that enhanced weathering produces rock dust that can be added to agricultural soils, removing atmospheric carbon dioxide, mitigating nitrous oxide production, and substituting for imported fertilizers. Lead author Dr. Euripides Kantzas of the Leverhulme Centre for Climate Change Mitigation at the University of Sheffield said, "By quantifying the carbon removal potential and co-benefits of amending crops with crushed rock in the UK, we...

Related ATTRA publication: Agriculture, Climate Disruption, and Carbon Sequestration For agricultural soils in the midwestern United States to continue to be productive, conservation practices must be widely implemented, according to a new report from the Center for Rural Affairs. Conservation Practice Impact on Carbon Sequestration takes a closer look at the carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emission reductions associated with conservation practices. The report highlights the benefits of soils that are high in organic matter and soil organic carbon, and describes climate-smart agriculture practices that can increase soil carbon....

Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists published a study on bioenergy sorghum hybrids that shows they can capture and sequester significant amounts of atmospheric carbon dioxide in soil. Specifically, the study revealed that an acre planted with a bioenergy sorghum hybrid accumulates about 3.1 tons of dry root biomass. In addition, a press release notes that bioenergy sorghum's 6.5-feet deep root system can reach water and nutrients that other annual crops don't. Researchers suggest the crop can help manage fertilizer runoff from other annuals in a crop rotation....

A study by researchers from Rutgers University-New Brunswick and the University of Maine indicates that agricultural practices can help increase carbon storage in soils. Ecosystem Service Valuation Approaches and Carbon Mitigation Considerations for Garden State Agriculture says that cover cropping, grazing management, and agroforestry can increase the amount of carbon stored in agricultural soils and help New Jersey meet emissions reductions goals. In addition, these practices can help provide other ecosystem services, ranging from soil health to flood mitigation....

University of Wisconsin agronomy professor Randy Jackson has been exploring the potential for cropping systems to accumulate enough carbon in agricultural soils to help stabilize the climate, reports Agri-View. Jackson's 15 years of research have shown that all cropping systems studied, including crop rotations and organic rotations, lose carbon over time. Pasture systems were able to maintain carbon levels, but this reflected a small gain in the top 30 cm offset by losses below that level. "We're losing 25 grams of carbon per meter squared in the annual cropping systems when we need to be gaining between 10 and 70...

Related ATTRA Publication: Sustainable Cotton Production for the Humid South The Ralph Lauren Corporate Foundation and the Soil Health Institute announced the launch of Institute's U.S. Regenerative Cotton Fund (USRCF), a unique, farmer-facing, science-based initiative that will support long-term, sustainable cotton production in the United States, with the goal of eliminating one million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent from the atmosphere by 2026. Organizers say the USRCF will empower cotton farmers to adopt regenerative practices, like cover cropping and no till, in a way that benefits their operation. The Soil Health Institute will work closely with cotton farmers to help them...