climate change Tag

Northeast dairy farmers struggling to produce feed and comply with nutrient-management regulations can benefit from double cropping and injecting manure into soils, says a research team led by Penn State. Professor Heather Karsten explains, "We have been trying to identify how to help dairy farms be profitable and produce more of their feed and forage crops while at the same time ease the challenges of nutrient management. Double cropping small grains such as winter wheat or winter rye and corn silages provides a strategy that can benefit dairy farms in the northeastern U.S. as they take advantage of a longer...

A new study from the University of British Columbia warns that the supply of ocean-farmed seafood could drop 16% by 2090 if no action is taken to mitigate climate change. Researchers say that if we continue to burn fossil fuels at our current rate, the amount of seafood such as fish or mussels able to be farmed sustainably will increase globally by only 8% by 2050, and decline by 16% by 2090. By comparison, in a low-emissions scenario where the action is taken to mitigate climate change, mariculture is projected to grow by about 17% by the mid-21st century and...

A project in New Zealand is releasing a series of 20 reports in November, each providing recommendations for how claims regarding specific possible benefits of regenerative agriculture could be tested in Aotearoa New Zealand. The report releases are accompanied by a webinar series. A group of four reports released last week focused on approaches to test whether regenerative agriculture can offer 'nature-based' solutions for climate change. Three more reports just released focus on regenerative agriculture's impact on animal welfare and biodiversity. The first of these reports says that regenerative farming practices could increase native biodiversity on New Zealand farms. The...

I had the privilege of undergoing my graduate school research in one of the best places on earth: Mendoza, Argentina. Mendoza, like many parts of California, is an arid region with very little rainfall, similar soils, and similar weather patterns. And, like California, it grows great wine. Unlike California, though, Mendoza still has many vineyards that are intercropped with trees in vineyard agroforestry systems. That's why, when I decided to study arid vineyard agroforestry systems for my master’s research, Mendoza is where I journeyed to. 
by Katherine Favor, Sustainable Agriculture Specialist...