climate smart agriculture Tag

Field studies at University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources' Desert Research and Extension Center revealed that drip irrigation is not only more water efficient, but it can also dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the soil. In comparison to furrow irrigation, drip irrigation in alfalfa reduced per-yield soil carbon dioxide emissions by 59%, nitrous oxide by 38%, and nitric oxide by 20%. For sudangrass, drip irrigation decreased water demand by 49% and reduced soil emissions of nitrous oxide by 59% and nitric oxide by 49%. Researchers point out that the state of California offers financial incentives to help growers...

Related ATTRA publication: Agriculture, Climate Disruption, and Carbon Sequestration For agricultural soils in the midwestern United States to continue to be productive, conservation practices must be widely implemented, according to a new report from the Center for Rural Affairs. Conservation Practice Impact on Carbon Sequestration takes a closer look at the carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emission reductions associated with conservation practices. The report highlights the benefits of soils that are high in organic matter and soil organic carbon, and describes climate-smart agriculture practices that can increase soil carbon....

Climate-resilient agricultural practices can help small farms in North Carolina profit in a changing climate, according to new research by North Carolina Agricultural and Technical University Cooperative Extension and Environmental Defense Fund. The research summarizes the real-world financial and climate resilience benefits that practices such as reduced tillage, cover cropping, and high tunnel use are providing three small farms in diverse growing regions: the coastal plain, the Piedmont, and the mountains. A summary report and three case studies share insights for farmers and their advisers to inform their financial decision-making when considering whether to implement climate-smart farming practices. ...

USDA has extended the deadlines to apply for the Partnerships for Climate-Smart Commodities funding opportunity after requests from many stakeholders. The deadline for the first funding pool, which encompasses requests from $5 million to $100 million, has been extended until May 6, 2022. The application deadline for the second funding pool, for proposals greater than $250,000 and under $5 million, has been extended to June 10, 2022....

USDA announced a new Partnerships for Climate-Smart Commodities program that will finance pilot projects that create market opportunities for U.S. agricultural and forestry products that use climate-smart practices and include innovative, cost-effective ways to measure and verify greenhouse gas benefits. USDA defines a climate-smart commodity as an agricultural commodity that is produced using agricultural (farming, ranching, or forestry) practices that reduce greenhouse gas emissions or sequester carbon. Funding will be provided to partners through the USDA's Commodity Credit Corporation for pilot projects to provide incentives to producers and landowners. Applications will be due April 8, 2022, for proposals from $5...

The National Institute of Food and Agriculture's Agriculture and Food Research Initiative is investing $9 million in six projects to bolster climate research and connect and share climate-smart solutions directly with the agricultural community. The funding goes to new Cooperative Extension and USDA Climate Hubs partnerships. "These new NIFA-funded projects will work toward net-zero emissions in agriculture, working lands and communities adapted to climate change, training a diverse workforce that can communicate and incorporate climate considerations into management and climate justice that is appropriate for unique U.S. agronomic conditions," said NIFA Director Dr. Carrie Castille. The projects are led by...

Thirty-five years ago, Becky Weed and Dave Tyler left successful careers to start a farm in Montana’s Gallatin Valley. As first-generation farmers, “Dave and I didn’t know our heads from a hole in the ground, but we wanted to merge our interest in conservation and ecological systems with jobs in agriculture,” recalled Becky.
By Linda Poole, Regenerative Grazing Specialist...

In this episode, Colin Mitchell, a sustainable agriculture specialist based out of NCAT’s Southwest Regional Office in San Antonio, Texas, is joined by Jeanne Merrill, policy director at the California Climate and Agriculture Network (CalCAN). Colin and Jeanne discuss different “Climate Smart Agriculture” tools and policies in California, including the Healthy Soils Program; the State Water Efficiency and Enhancement Program; the Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program; the Sustainable Agriculture Lands Conservation Program; the Alternative Manure Management Program; and the Climate Adaptation Program. They also discuss carbon markets, water quality trading, and other issues. Related ATTRA Resources: Publications Payments for Ecosystem Services Agriculture, Climate Change, and Carbon...