grapes Tag

Researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder are studying the environmental fate of sulfur that is applied as a fungicide by California winegrowers. Research published in Environmental Research Letters tracked the unique fingerprint of the agricultural sulfur as runoff through downstream waterways. Sulfur is the top pesticide used in California agriculture, mostly in vineyards. "This work could help inform the development of technologies that help farmers to choose when and how much they apply, rather than just applying the same amount preventatively all the time," explained the study's senior author Eve-Lyn Hinckley. "My objective as a scientist is to always...

Related ATTRA publication: High Tunnel Grapes: Establishment University of Minnesota Extension has a new online course, Growing Cold Climate Grapes, available for grape growers, vineyard managers, gardeners, and prospective vineyard owners. The free course is not scheduled, so students can utilize the course materials at their own pace. The course contains 11 modules. Each module covers a different topic about vineyard management, from planting to harvesting and everything in between. The modules include a variety of videos, interactive images, and written content. At the end of each module, a quiz invites participants to test their knowledge of the topic. ...

Related ATTRA Publication: Soils and Sites for Organic Orchards and Vineyards Researchers at Penn State say that cover crops in vineyards can reduce erosion during heavy rainfall, enhance soil health, reduce herbicide use, and improve water quality. In addition, they say growers who inform and educate consumers about using cover crops for their environmental benefits may be able to charge more for their wine. Specifically, in a survey conducted during this study, 72% of 956 wine consumers from the mid-Atlantic region were willing to pay $18.99 for a 750-ml bottle of wine, which included a $1 surcharge to cover the additional costs...

Powdery mildew has plagued vineyards since time immemorial. If temperatures reach between 70 and 85 degrees, chances are, powdery mildew has woken up from its slumber and is ready to infect your grapes. When left unchecked, this fungus can reduce vine growth, sabotage yields, and reduce fruit quality. There are all sorts of practices in our integrated pest-management toolbox that we can use to control powdery mildew. Prevention is always number one, but there are plenty of mitigation strategies we can employ as well. Here are some good examples:
By Katherine Favor, NCAT Sustainable Agriculture Specialist ...