IPM Tag

“Kill two birds with one stone” — isn't it time this old adage got an update? Instead of killing two birds with one stone, why don't we save two birds with one hedgerow? And protect soil from erosion while we're at it? And protect plants from wind damage, too? And do a bunch of other great things that benefit humans, animals, and the environment?
By Katherine Favor, NCAT Sustainable Agriculture Specialist...

In this episode of Voices from the Field, NCAT Sustainable Agriculture Specialist Katherine Favor heads to Terranova Ranch in the central San Joaquin Valley of California to talk about conservation hedgerows with Don Cameron, the ranch’s general manager and vice president.
NCAT Sustainable Agriculture Specialist Katherine Favor and Don Cameron, General Manager of Terranova Ranch...

Terranova Ranch is dedicated to producing more than 25 premium quality crops as effectively, productively, and sustainably as possible in the central San Joaquin Valley of California. Toward that end, they have implemented a wide variety of conservation and regenerative agriculture practices, including sustainable irrigation practices and conservation hedgerows. In this video, Don Cameron, General Manager and Vice President of Terranova Ranch, discusses conservation hedgerows, including their benefits and challenges, along with do's and don'ts for hedgerow design and installation. Since planting these hedgerows just two years ago, Don has seen a wide variety of positive changes at the ranch, including...

Related ATTRA Publication: Pruning for Organic Management of Fruit Tree Diseases Researchers at Iowa State University, The Ohio State University, and the USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) partnered to find ways to make apple-orchard pesticide applications effective while causing the least harm to the environment. They found that a targeted spraying method that used laser beams and sensors to detect foliage could reduce overall pesticide use by 30-70%. In addition, using a weather-based warning system that measures the number of hours that humidity is over 90% in the orchard helped indicate the appropriate times to use fungicide. This cut fungicide applications by 25%....

Powdery mildew has plagued vineyards since time immemorial. If temperatures reach between 70 and 85 degrees, chances are, powdery mildew has woken up from its slumber and is ready to infect your grapes. When left unchecked, this fungus can reduce vine growth, sabotage yields, and reduce fruit quality. There are all sorts of practices in our integrated pest-management toolbox that we can use to control powdery mildew. Prevention is always number one, but there are plenty of mitigation strategies we can employ as well. Here are some good examples:
By Katherine Favor, NCAT Sustainable Agriculture Specialist ...