Katherine Favor Tag

“Kill two birds with one stone” — isn't it time this old adage got an update? Instead of killing two birds with one stone, why don't we save two birds with one hedgerow? And protect soil from erosion while we're at it? And protect plants from wind damage, too? And do a bunch of other great things that benefit humans, animals, and the environment?
By Katherine Favor, NCAT Sustainable Agriculture Specialist...

It’s the holiday season, the time of year when food and feasting is at the forefront of our thoughts more than ever. Just like humans, our soil needs nutrition, too, so while part of me is busy thinking about what food I’m going to make for my family this Christmas, the other part of me is thinking about what food my soil needs.
By Katherine Favor, NCAT Sustainable Agriculture Specialist...

In this episode of Voices from the Field, NCAT Sustainable Agriculture Specialist Omar Rodriguez introduces Katherine Favor, NCAT’s newest specialist at its Western Regional Office in Davis, California. Katherine is a self-identified agroforestry nerd, perennial plant enthusiast, wine farmer, and yerba maté lover. She has worked on, designed, consulted for, and managed regenerative agriculture systems for more than 10 years. Her love of viticulture and agroforestry took her from Southern California to Montana, Paraguay, and Argentina before she finally ended up in Northern California at NCAT. She is passionate about the intersection of natural resources conservation, food security, and community well-being, and...

I had the privilege of undergoing my graduate school research in one of the best places on earth: Mendoza, Argentina. Mendoza, like many parts of California, is an arid region with very little rainfall, similar soils, and similar weather patterns. And, like California, it grows great wine. Unlike California, though, Mendoza still has many vineyards that are intercropped with trees in vineyard agroforestry systems. That's why, when I decided to study arid vineyard agroforestry systems for my master’s research, Mendoza is where I journeyed to. 
by Katherine Favor, Sustainable Agriculture Specialist...

Powdery mildew has plagued vineyards since time immemorial. If temperatures reach between 70 and 85 degrees, chances are, powdery mildew has woken up from its slumber and is ready to infect your grapes. When left unchecked, this fungus can reduce vine growth, sabotage yields, and reduce fruit quality. There are all sorts of practices in our integrated pest-management toolbox that we can use to control powdery mildew. Prevention is always number one, but there are plenty of mitigation strategies we can employ as well. Here are some good examples:
By Katherine Favor, NCAT Sustainable Agriculture Specialist ...