livestock and pasture Tag

Related ATTRA Publication: Building Healthy Pasture Soils The Nature Conservancy's Dunn Ranch Prairie is the Midwest's first grassbank, reports Harvest Public Media. A grazing agreement allows two local ranchers to put cattle on the tallgrass prairie in Missouri for a couple of months. This allows the ranchers' land to rest, while the cattle's hoof trampling and grazing help keep the prairie healthy. Experts stress the importance of grazing and other natural forces in prairie restoration, saying that planned and managed grazing helps control weeds and invasive species....

Related ATTRA publication: Tools for Managing Internal Parasites in Small Ruminants: Pasture Management A North Carolina livestock producer received a grant from Southern Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SSARE) to explore the use of native warm-season grasses as forage for Katahdin Hair sheep as a way quickly bring the animals to market weight, and for better parasite control. Lee Holcomb of LeeDer Farm is establishing big blue stem, little blue stem, and Indian grass in some of his pastures to see if they can help weaned lambs put on more weight and have less exposure to barber pole worms. The native grasses...

A study by USDA scientists, published in Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment Journal, evaluated the greenhouse-gas emissions from grazed grasslands in Oklahoma. Three of the pastures studied were native prairies and one was a planted single species of grass. The team found that in this hot, subhumid area, all the sites were net emitters of carbon dioxide on a yearly basis. All sites emitted small amounts of nitrous oxide, but the non-native site, which received fertilizer, emitted the most nitrous oxide. Scientist noted that, with nitrous oxide being three hundred times stronger at trapping heat than carbon dioxide, this difference really...

Wisconsin beef producer Justin Seeger shared some of his winter grazing innovations at a recent pasture walk, reports Agri-View. Seeger, who has a full-time hoof-trimming operation, is looking to save labor on his cattle operation. He stretches the winter grazing season by windrowing corn stalks and using portable electric fence to portion the windrows out to his cattle. This year, he's added dry hay and ground corn-stalk bales to the windrows for more nutrition and volume. Extending the grazing season not only helps keep feed costs low but also helps save farm labor. Seeger calves in April and May....

How many animals should I have? This is the second session of the three-part Building Strong Foundations series for beginning livestock farmers. Learn about soil structure and its effect on water infiltration​, then find out how to determine the carrying capacity​ of your land. Find out how adaptive management​ helps you “keep your eyes on the prize” through observing, implementing, and adapting. Having the right number of livestock for your farm will help you take better care of your land and make money with fewer costs. Find Part 1 here. Find Part 3 here. This video is produced by the National Center for...

Taking care of your land. Wondering how to get started with livestock? In the first of a three-part series for beginning livestock farmers, NCAT specialists introduce the principles of soil health and explain how healthy land is the foundation of successful livestock production. Presenters explain the concepts of minimizing disturbance, maximizing biodiversity, keeping soil covered, maintaining living roots in the soil, and including animals. Find out how grazing affects the plant, soils, and livestock and learn the importance of grazing plants at the right time and allowing full plant recovery before re-grazing. By respecting the soil health and grazing principles,...

Related ATTRA resource: Regenerative Grazing A feature in Texas Monthly showcases ranchers Meredith Ellis, at G Bar C Ranch, and Travis Krause of Parker Creek Ranch, who discuss what regenerative agriculture means for them and their ranch operations. Both ranchers explain some of the economic considerations of a regenerative approach to agriculture, as well as the environmental benefits, based on their own experiences....

Related ATTRA Tutorial: Managed Grazing Researchers from South Dakota State University and Texas A&M University surveyed producers in 2018 in South and North Dakota and in Texas about grazing intensity. The results were just published in Land Use Policy. Of the South Dakota respondents, 39.37% use traditional continuous grazing, 54.92% use rotational grazing, and 5.71% use management-intensive grazing. In North Dakota 29.24% opt for continuous grazing, 60.68% for rotational grazing, and 9.83% for management-intensive grazing. The study found that producers using management-intensive grazing were most likely to expand their grass-based production due to higher profitability, usually achieving expansion of grazing land...

Related ATTRA Podcast: Sheep and the Sun: Solar Grazing with Lexie Hain Cornell University and USDA funded a three-year, $500,000 project that will explore forming a business cooperative to provide shepherds grazing under solar arrays with coordination and logistical services. Having sheep graze under solar arrays is becoming more popular as a way to control vegetation and keep the land under solar installations in agricultural production. However, it can be a challenge for large renewable energy companies to manage the grazing services offered primarily by small-scale shepherds. This project will explore the benefits to farmers of business collaboration, not only to offer...

USDA has a new online tool to help ranchers document and estimate payments to cover feed transportation costs caused by drought, which are now covered by the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees and Farm-raised Fish Program (ELAP). The new ELAP Feed Transportation Producer Tool is a Microsoft Excel workbook that enables ranchers to input information specific to their operation to determine an estimated payment. ELAP now covers feed transportation costs where grazing and hay resources have been depleted. This includes places where drought intensity is D2 for eight consecutive weeks or drought intensity is D3 or greater....

The Prairie Project is a consortium of researchers, extension specialists, and educators from Texas, Oklahoma, and Nebraska that is exploring prescribed burns and grazing as ways to combat woody invasive species on Great Plains grasslands and make grazing land more resilient to wildfire and extreme heat. The Prairie Project received $10 million in funding from USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture for a five-year trial of pyric herbivory, which involves combining prescribed fire with mixed-animal grazing to restore grasslands lost to encroaching woody plants....