soil carbon Tag

The USDA Forest Service has posted a free, 27-minute on-demand webinar originally delivered at the 2019 Restoring the West Conference, titled Using Fire to Build Soil Carbon and Water Holding Capacity. In this presentation, Dr. Deborah Page-Dumroese, a soil scientist with the USDA Forest Service, discusses loss of soil functions and what can be done, learning from a biochar model, and increasing soil water at the landscape scale....

Related ATTRA blog: Payments for Ecosystem Services The Ecosystem Services Market Consortium (ESMC) and the Foundation for Food & Agriculture Research (FFAR) announced the launch of ESMC's ecosystem services market program, Eco-Harvest. The program rewards agricultural producers for beneficial environmental outcomes from regenerative agriculture by generating and selling credits for increased soil carbon, reduced greenhouse gases, and improved water quality from agricultural production systems. Partners invested $20.6 million in developing the digitized and advanced technology program and platform to generate high quality, third-party verified credits for soil carbon removals, avoided and reduced greenhouse gases, and water impacts from U.S. farms. ESMC is...

The Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) developed a new, non-destructive method for finding carbon stored in the soil by plants and microbes. According to a press release, this new method for measuring carbon pulled out of the air promises to be an important tool for fighting climate change and developing more ecologically friendly forms of agriculture. The new method uses a device that scans the soil with a beam of neutrons that react to carbon and other elements in the soil, mapping the distribution of different elements to a resolution of about five centimeters. The method...

In this episode of Voices from the Field, Martin Guerena, a sustainable agriculture specialist with the National Center for Appropriate Technology’s western regional office in Davis, California, speaks with Sean Feder, director of inspection operations for California Certified Organic Farmers.
Martin Guerena and Sean Feder ...

A study by researchers from Rutgers University-New Brunswick and the University of Maine indicates that agricultural practices can help increase carbon storage in soils. Ecosystem Service Valuation Approaches and Carbon Mitigation Considerations for Garden State Agriculture says that cover cropping, grazing management, and agroforestry can increase the amount of carbon stored in agricultural soils and help New Jersey meet emissions reductions goals. In addition, these practices can help provide other ecosystem services, ranging from soil health to flood mitigation....

University of Illinois researchers studied how nitrogen in crop residues contributes to loss of soil carbon as the residue decomposes. Their trials showed that any form of nitrogen, either present in the residue or applied as fertilizer, accelerated decomposition by microbes and produced more carbon dioxide. When the residue was fully decomposed, microbes turned to soil carbon, or stable organic matter. This led to greater overall carbon dioxide production from nitrogen-fertilized residue, as well as a long-term loss of soil organic matter. The researchers plan to conduct similar testing in other soil types to see if they perform the same...

University of Wisconsin agronomy professor Randy Jackson has been exploring the potential for cropping systems to accumulate enough carbon in agricultural soils to help stabilize the climate, reports Agri-View. Jackson's 15 years of research have shown that all cropping systems studied, including crop rotations and organic rotations, lose carbon over time. Pasture systems were able to maintain carbon levels, but this reflected a small gain in the top 30 cm offset by losses below that level. "We're losing 25 grams of carbon per meter squared in the annual cropping systems when we need to be gaining between 10 and 70...

Soil health has emerged as a central theme in conversations about the future of American agriculture. Soils have become a focal topic due to new scientific understanding, the application of emerging technologies, and a growing interest among producers and policymakers in improving climate resilience and mitigating emissions. NCAT's Soil Health Innovations Conference was held online with live-streamed speakers and panels, as well as virtual halls for exhibitors and student posters. The event allowed participants to network with exhibitors and sponsors and the producers, industry professionals, educators, and students who are at the cutting edge of soil health across the country. This video...