Bees Tag

The American Veterinary Medical Association reports that interest in veterinary medicine for honeybees is growing in the United States. For example, veterinary students at Michigan State University are offered a three-week elective course on the subject, and a new textbook, Honey Bee Medicine for the Veterinary Practitioner, was published in 2021. In addition, there's a Honey Bee Veterinary Consortium, a nonprofit organization formed with the purpose of training veterinarians in honeybee medicine. Its website offers resources for veterinarians, and the group is developing a certification course for veterinarians that will require 150 hours of training in honeybee medicine....

Terranova Ranch is dedicated to producing more than 25 premium quality crops as effectively, productively, and sustainably as possible in the central San Joaquin Valley of California. Toward that end, they have implemented a wide variety of conservation and regenerative agriculture practices, including sustainable irrigation practices and conservation hedgerows. In this video, Don Cameron, General Manager and Vice President of Terranova Ranch, discusses conservation hedgerows, including their benefits and challenges, along with do's and don'ts for hedgerow design and installation. Since planting these hedgerows just two years ago, Don has seen a wide variety of positive changes at the ranch, including...

In this episode of Voices from the Field, NCAT Sustainable Agriculture Specialist Mike Lewis sits down with Dr. Tom Webster from Kentucky State University Cooperative Extension Services to talk about the role pollinators play in farm ecosystems, how to attract more pollinators, and how to protect them when they arrive. It all comes down to planning, and Dr. Webster offers some great strategies for increasing pollinator health and diversity on your farm. ATTRA Resources: A Pictorial Guide to Hedgerow Plants for Beneficial Insects Alternative Pollinators: Native Bees Contact Mike Lewis via email at mikel@ncat.org. Please complete a brief survey to let us know...

As we round the corner from summer into fall, I always like to look back and assess how we did on our farm during the busy summer months. We did not suffer a bad drought this summer, though it was touch and go for a few weeks in July. We had to feed hay for about ten days to make sure we didn’t graze the grass too short, but it wasn’t as dire as it has been some years.
By Nina Prater, NCAT Agriculture Specialist ...