poultry Tag

USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in flocks in several more states: Michigan, Maine, Delaware, New York, Connecticut, Iowa, Maryland, Missouri, and South Dakota. APHIS advises that anyone involved with poultry production from the small backyard to the large commercial producer should review their biosecurity activities to assure the health of their birds. APHIS has materials about biosecurity, including videos, checklists, and a toolkit available online. In addition to practicing good biosecurity, all bird owners should prevent contact between their birds and wild birds and report sick birds...

Related ATTRA publication: Biosecurity Basics Tipsheet for Pastured Poultry USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed highly pathogenic avian influenza in more states during the past week. It was confirmed in a flock of commercial broiler chickens in Kentucky, a mixed backyard flock in Virginia, and in non-poultry flocks in New York and Maine. Anyone involved with poultry production from the small backyard to the large commercial producer should review their biosecurity activities to assure the health of their birds. APHIS has materials about biosecurity, including videos, checklists, and a toolkit, available online. ...

Related ATTRA publication: Biosecurity Basics Tipsheet for Pastured Poultry USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in wild birds in several states in the Atlantic Flyway in January as well as in a commercial turkey flock in Indiana on February 8, 2022. APHIS is expanding wild bird surveillance for avian influenza to include the Mississippi and Central Flyways. APHIS advises that anyone involved with poultry should review their biosecurity plan and enhance their biosecurity practices to ensure the health of their birds. In addition to practicing good biosecurity, all bird owners should prevent contact between...

How many animals should I have? This is the second session of the three-part Building Strong Foundations series for beginning livestock farmers. Learn about soil structure and its effect on water infiltration​, then find out how to determine the carrying capacity​ of your land. Find out how adaptive management​ helps you “keep your eyes on the prize” through observing, implementing, and adapting. Having the right number of livestock for your farm will help you take better care of your land and make money with fewer costs. Find Part 1 here. Find Part 3 here. This video is produced by the National Center for...

Taking care of your land. Wondering how to get started with livestock? In the first of a three-part series for beginning livestock farmers, NCAT specialists introduce the principles of soil health and explain how healthy land is the foundation of successful livestock production. Presenters explain the concepts of minimizing disturbance, maximizing biodiversity, keeping soil covered, maintaining living roots in the soil, and including animals. Find out how grazing affects the plant, soils, and livestock and learn the importance of grazing plants at the right time and allowing full plant recovery before re-grazing. By respecting the soil health and grazing principles,...

Recognizing that poultry products are the primary route for human exposure to the foodborne disease Salmonella, researchers at Iowa State University are exploring the link between poultry immune and nervous systems as a potential treatment. They found that treating chickens with the drug Reserpine triggers intestinal cells to release a neurochemical called norepinephrine that activates an antimicrobial immune response that significantly reduces salmonella bacteria. "Using this approach is really about stimulating the host's ability to fight the infection on its own and solve the problem at its source," explained study leader Melha Mellata. The researchers say their research offers a...

Diversity is a key insurance strategy on many farms, as multiple revenue streams can help keep a farm more stable in trying times. Most successful farmers I know employ this strategy and they are always on the lookout for new, higher-value enterprises to try out. The same is true on my farm in Kentucky. Last year, a restaurant client asked if we could raise pastured quail for their menu. They currently purchase 600 quail annually but believe that locally sourced quail will double their annual demand. 
By Mike Lewis, Sustainable Agriculture Specialist...

I have been raising livestock since I was a young child, and I have learned some things in doing so. Today I want to share an easy way to think through animal observations. These basic indicators of animal health will allow you, the livestock manager, to see early warning signs and take effective action. While my experience is mostly with sheep and goats, these principles apply to other livestock, as well.
By Linda Coffey, Livestock Specialist...

A new report from USDA Economic Research Service documents a growing market for chicken products raised without any antibiotics. The Market for Chicken Raised Without Antibiotics, 2012–17 says that household expenditures for classic, processed, and sausage products labeled as "raised without antibiotics" grew substantially during the study period. The report also notes that the chicken labeled as being raised without antibiotics commanded higher prices per pound than conventional chicken products. The authors point out that "[t]hese findings suggest there is significant consumer interest and market opportunities for production practices between conventional and organic."...

Beginning poultry producers commonly ask How do I navigate poultry processing regulations for selling poultry meat? or Does it make more sense to process my broilers on-farm or to take them to a processing facility?
By Ann Baier, NCAT Sustainable Agriculture Specialist...